Today at Book Riot...

Adaptation, by Malinda Lo

Adaptation, by Malinda Lo

Inheritance, by Malinda Lo

Inheritance, by Malinda Lo

...I wrote a bit about some of the first contact stories I've been binging on lately, including Adaptation and Inheritance by Malinda Lo:

HOW ARE THESE BOOKS NOT MORE WELL-KNOWN? Smart and complex on all levels—personal, emotional, cultural, and political—as well as exciting, with subplots that provide commentary on immigration, government surveillance, profiling, and more. AND. I really thought I was over love triangles FOREVER, but this duology changed my mind: not only does it feature a girl torn between a boy and another girl, but it also brings up polyamory as a possible solution, which I think I’ve only ever seen one other time in YA.

Yesterday at Kirkus Reviews...

Peas and Carrots, by Tanita S. Davis

Peas and Carrots, by Tanita S. Davis

The Girl from Everywhere, by Heidi Heilig

The Girl from Everywhere, by Heidi Heilig

...I rounded up a whole bunch of YA books due out this month. BECAUSE, YOU KNOW, I NEED MORE BOOKS TO READ.

Today at Kirkus Reviews...

Burn Baby Burn by Meg Medina

Burn Baby Burn by Meg Medina

...I wrote about Meg Medina's Burn Baby Burn and HOW FANTASTIC IT IS:

Medina weaves in details about the time—the movie Carrie prompted the “little knives” conversation—as well as specific events and slang and ’70s culture and descriptions of clothing and so on in a way that is so entirely organic that I felt like I was watching a movie that had actually been filmed in the ’70s. (I say “watching a movie” because I didn’t even notice myself turning the pages—I was that engrossed.)

SO GOOD SO GOOD SO GOOD!

*falls over from the excellence*

Diversity in Publishing: 2015.

Diversity Baseline Survey 2015, from Lee & Low Books.

Diversity Baseline Survey 2015, from Lee & Low Books.

As you probably know, Lee & Low books has been working to put together a Diversity Baseline Survey of the book industry for over a year now:

Countless panels, articles, and even conferences have been dedicated to exploring the causes and effects of this lack of diversity. Yet one key piece of the puzzle remained a question mark: diversity among publishing staff. While the lack of diversity among publishing staff was often spoken about, there was very little hard data about who exactly works in publishing.

At the beginning of 2015 we decided to conduct a survey to establish a baseline that would measure the amount of diversity among publishing staff. We believed in the power of hard numbers to illuminate a problem that can otherwise be dismissed or swept under the rug. We felt that having hard numbers released publicly would help publishers take ownership of the problem and increase accountability. We also felt that a baseline was needed to measure whether or not initiatives to increase diversity among publishing staff were actually working.

Their infographic above will give you a quick snapshot of where we're at, but do please, PLEASE click through for more information, including methodology and analysis. This is important stuff.

Today at Kirkus Reviews...

The Girl from Everywhere, by Heidi Heilig

The Girl from Everywhere, by Heidi Heilig

...I talk about Heidi Heilig's upcoming The Girl from Everywhere:

The worldbuilding incorporates both history and myth, and Heilig’s descriptions of Hawaii—most of the story takes place in Hawaii toward the end of the monarchy—are colorful and lush and vivid and loving. It’s a fast-paced adventure with plenty of action, but it also deals with empire and colonialism, with class and racism—personally, as experienced by Nix, whose mother was Chinese, and other members of Slate’s very diverse crew, as well as part of the larger picture—and with guilt and grief and addiction.