New YA: January 24.

There is no dogNew hardcovers:

There is No Dog, by Meg Rosoff:

It wasn't just the tone that reminded me of Douglas Adams. It was the warmth—it was how Meg Rosoff was able to poke fun at (and sometimes skewer) humankind (and our mythology), while also conveying a sense of never-ending affection, wonder, and empathy. There's a sense of hope, too, but it's a realist's sort of hope—one that takes the past into account—so while there are brief, perfect moments of beauty, everything is tempered with a cheerful sort of pessimism.

The Way We Fall, by Megan Crewe.
Amazon | Indiebound.

Pink Smog: Becoming Weetzie Bat, by Francesca Lia Block.
Amazon | Indiebound.

My Awesome/Awful Popularity Plan, by Seth Rudetsky: 

Despite Justin's voice—and he really did make me laugh quite a few times—I found him a difficult character to like. Part of that was certainly due to his desperation to be popular, as there were moments when he took Trying Too Hard—which is never an attractive quality, though it's certainly not an uncommon one—to an excruciatingly new level. He was so self-absorbed that he treated people poorly, and despite his brains and his wit, I never felt like I connected with him. I can deal with an unlikable character that I understand/connect with, and I can deal with a likable character who I have to work to understand, but if I strike out in both arenas... eh.

Life Eternal: Dead Beautiful, #2, by Yvonne Woon
Amazon | Indiebound.

Havoc: A Deviants Novel, by Jeff Sampson
Amazon | Indiebound.

Getting Over Garrett Delaney, by Abby McDonald
Amazon | Indiebound.

Fallen in Love: A Fallen Novel in Stories, by Lauren Kate
Amazon | Indiebound.

Everneath, by Brodi Ashton
Amazon | Indiebound.

Diabolical: Tantalize #4, by Cynthia Leitich Smith:

Fun stuff, as always. If you like the rest of the series, Diabolical shouldn't disappoint. The strongest aspect, as in previous installments, is in the worldbuilding. That isn't to say that any of the other aspects are weak—the characters are likable and believable, the dialogue rings true, the different voices are all distinct, and the action is fabulously entertaining—but it's the worldbuilding that really shines.

Centauriad #1: Daughter of the Centaurs, by Kate Klimo
Amazon | Indiebound.

New paperbacks:

Split, by Swati Avasthi:

I loved this one. It dealt with domestic violence, spousal and child abuse in a realistic, believable way. While there were some utterly gut-wrenching, horrifying moments, I never felt that it was exploitative, and I never felt that Avasthi was working from a list of statistics about domestic abuse. (A lot of books that deal with Serious Issues do feel like that, so I think it's worth noting that Split didn't.)

Dark Goddess: Devil's Kiss #2, by Sarwat Chadda
Amazon | Indiebound.

Forbidden, by Syrie James and Ryan M. James
Amazon | Indiebound.

Mesmerize, by Artist Arthur
Amazon | Indiebound.

The Taming, by Teresa Toten and Eric Walters
Amazon | Indiebound.